Sep 18, 2021Kuina-chan


This is a non-stop album of 12 songs and 40 minutes, packed with all of Kuina-chan's musicality.
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kuina_chan_fusion.mp3
File 0-1: Kuina-chan Fusion
The following 12 songs, totaling 40 minutes, are connected non-stop(Figure 0-1).
  1. Sandcastle And Ice Cream [0:00]
  2. Decayed Clock Tower [3:32]
  3. Wind Blowing Through The Spring [7:04]
  4. The Shining Frozen World [10:34]
  5. Children's Territory [13:54]
  6. Beasts Run Through The Storm [17:16]
  7. Penguins' Wish [20:24]
  8. Serpent [24:03]
  9. Minuet Of Soap Bubbles [27:13]
  10. Fire Festival At Dusk [30:53]
  11. Non-alcoholic Cocktails [34:09]
  12. Flood Of Stardust [36:59]
Figure 0-1: List Of Song Titles
The following is a description of each song.

1A Sandcastle And Ice Cream [0:00]

It is a refreshing song, like a temporary breeze blowing on a sandy beach in the middle of summer. Since this is the first song, I tried to keep the tune catchy and easy to understand.
C major, 4/4 time, sonata form. Exposition -> Development -> Recapitulation. The motif is "fusion".

1.1Exposition [0:00]



[0:00] The exposition of this piece is composed as follows: Introduction -> First Subject Group -> Transition -> Second Subject Group. It starts with a bright introduction(Figure 1-1).
A Sandcastle And Ice Cream(1)
Figure 1-1: A Sandcastle And Ice Cream(1)
[0:14] The first subject group is a light phrase with a lot of syncopation, which reminds us of the fun of playing on the beach. In general, in sonata form, the first subject group is played in the tonic key with light phrase, and the second subject group is played in the modulation with slow phrase. They draw a contrast between the themes(Figure 1-2).
A Sandcastle And Ice Cream(2)
Figure 1-2: A Sandcastle And Ice Cream(2)
[0:26] This is the transition. Here it prepares for the transition to the second subject group. The key is casually changed from C major to B major. To impress the audience, the first subject group to the transition is repeated again(Figure 1-3).
A Sandcastle And Ice Cream(3)
Figure 1-3: A Sandcastle And Ice Cream(3)
[1:18] The second subject group is inspired by the vast seashore. The melody is sung on the rhythm of quarter note(Figure 1-4).
A Sandcastle And Ice Cream(4)
Figure 1-4: A Sandcastle And Ice Cream(4)

1.2Development [1:47]



[1:47] The development of sonata form is usually played freely by combining the first subject group and the second subject group. In this piece, the first half of the development is played with syncopated rhythm like the first subject group, and the second half is played with improvisational phrases with quarter-note rhythm like the second subject group(Figure 1-5).
A Sandcastle And Ice Cream(5)
Figure 1-5: A Sandcastle And Ice Cream(5)

1.3Recapitulation [2:45]



[2:45] In the recapitulation, the exposition is replayed. In the exposition, the second subject group is played in a different key from the first subject group, but in the recapitulation, they are played in the same key, which gives the impression that the tension is resolved.

2Decayed Clock Tower [3:32]

Even though the hands have stopped, the time continues to tick by.
D minor, 5/4 time, sonata form. Exposition -> Development -> Recapitulation. The motif is "classic".

2.1Exposition [3:32]



[3:38] The piece begins with a tense introduction. The five beats are inspired by the second hand of a clock(Figure 2-1).
Decayed Clock Tower(1)
Figure 2-1: Decayed Clock Tower(1)
[3:41] This is the first subject group. The use of many notes that are not in the original scale of the key creates an uneasy atmosphere(Figure 2-2).
Decayed Clock Tower(2)
Figure 2-2: Decayed Clock Tower(2)
[3:54] Transition. A phrase with a bias toward high notes changes the atmosphere and creates an effect that highlights the second subject group(Figure 2-3).
Decayed Clock Tower(3)
Figure 2-3: Decayed Clock Tower(3)
[4:09] This is the second subject group. The dissonance that existed until now is gone, and an emotional and sad melody is played(Figure 2-4).
Decayed Clock Tower(4)
Figure 2-4: Decayed Clock Tower(4)

2.2Development [4:49]



[4:49] Tense phrases mainly based on the first subject group are developed in an unhurried manner.

2.3Recapitulation [5:47]



[5:47] The phrase of the exposition is reappeared. The second subject group is played in the same key as the first subject group and ends in a sad mood.

3Wind Blowing Through The Spring [7:04]

Spring has arrived.
E major, 4/4 time, three-part form. A -> B -> A. The motif is "bossa nova".

3.1Part A [7:04]



[7:04] A light and gentle introduction(Figure 3-1).
Wind Blowing Through The Spring(1)
Figure 3-1: Wind Blowing Through The Spring(1)
[7:13] The song progresses with a fast, light rhythm. It is inspired by the coming of spring(Figure 3-2).
Wind Blowing Through The Spring(2)
Figure 3-2: Wind Blowing Through The Spring(2)

3.2Part B [8:20]



[8:20] The song modulates and the melody sings freely(Figure 3-3).
Wind Blowing Through The Spring(3)
Figure 3-3: Wind Blowing Through The Spring(3)
[8:41] Repeatedly modulating, the song becomes lively with a hint of sadness(Figure 3-4).
Wind Blowing Through The Spring(4)
Figure 3-4: Wind Blowing Through The Spring(4)
[9:00] After returning to the original key, the melody develops more freely.

3.3Part A [9:38]



[9:38] Part A is played again. In contrast to the sonata form, the three-part form is smaller, simpler, and may give the impression of being less exciting.

4The Shining Frozen World [10:34]

It is a frozen, silvery world illuminated by moonlight.
F minor, 4/4 time, free-form. The motif is "trance".
[10:34] This starts with a phrase that will be important throughout the song. This phrase is used frequently thereafter(Figure 4-1).
The Shining Frozen World(1)
Figure 4-1: The Shining Frozen World(1)
[10:44] Minimalist progression continues with the repetition of the characteristic riff.(Figure 4-2).
The Shining Frozen World(2)
Figure 4-2: The Shining Frozen World(2)
[11:11] The accompaniment stops for a moment and the opening phrase is played. Then the minimalist progression is repeated again(Figure 4-3).
The Shining Frozen World(3)
Figure 4-3: The Shining Frozen World(3)
[11:51] This is the middle section. A new theme is used, and a free and beautiful melody develops against the previous simple progression(Figure 4-4).
The Shining Frozen World(4)
Figure 4-4: The Shining Frozen World(4)
[12:31] Eventually, the phrases from the beginning of the song will weave in and out, and the song begins to build(Figure 4-5).
The Shining Frozen World(5)
Figure 4-5: The Shining Frozen World(5)
[13:11] It then returns to a minimalist progression and closes with a lingering note.

5Children's Territory [13:54]

Selfish and free spirited, but lovable.
G major, 4/4 time, sonata form. Exposition -> Development -> Recapitulation. The motif is "rock and roll".

5.1Exposition [13:54]



[13:54] A characteristic introduction(Figure 5-1).
Children's Territory(1)
Figure 5-1: Children's Territory(1)
[14:07] The first subject group. The whole-note descending chords and uncoordinated melody express a free-spirited image(Figure 5-2).
Children's Territory(2)
Figure 5-2: Children's Territory(2)
[14:32] The second subject group. A phrase that expresses fearlessness and bravery, ascending and then descending in a single bound(Figure 5-3).
Children's Territory(3)
Figure 5-3: Children's Territory(3)

5.2Development [15:03]



[15:03] The development begins with a phrase combining the first and second subject group. It is a little more gentle than the self-satisfied exposition(Figure 5-4).
Children's Territory(4)
Figure 5-4: Children's Territory(4)

5.3Recapitulation [15:36]



[15:36] The exposition is reproduced. The next piece is a very intense one, so the intervals between pieces are lengthened to keep the audience waiting.

6Beasts Run Through The Storm [17:16]

They were unafraid and never looked back.
A minor, 4/4 time, sonata form. Exposition -> Development -> Recapitulation. The motif is "melodic speed metal".

6.1Exposition [17:16]



[17:17] The first subject group is a long phrase that is always positive. The theme is repeated with a semitone higher and a sad glockenspiel sound(Figure 6-1).
Beasts Run Through The Storm(1)
Figure 6-1: Beasts Run Through The Storm(1)
[18:07] Magnificent second subject group. It is a slow melody with eighth notes and quarter notes, while the first subject group is a fine phrase with many sixteenth notes(Figure 6-2).
Beasts Run Through The Storm(2)
Figure 6-2: Beasts Run Through The Storm(2)

6.2Development [18:35]



[18:35] Free development section. Every few bars, the chord rises a semitone, creating a tense atmosphere.

6.3Recapitulation [19:22]



[19:22] This is a reprise of the exposition. It ends with a slow tempo.

7Penguins' Wish [20:24]

This is an odd time signature song, inspired by the unsteady gait of a penguin.
B major, free time, free-form. The motif is "free time".
For the sake of convenience, let's assume that the structure is A -> B -> C -> B -> A.
[20:30] Part A. The time signature repeats: 8 beats -> 7 beats -> 6 beats -> 7 beats. The repetition of the rising and falling of the woodwinds behind the melody is characteristic(Figure 7-1).
Penguins' Wish(1)
Figure 7-1: Penguins' Wish(1)
[21:05] The end of Part A. Slightly avant-garde chord progression(Figure 7-2).
Penguins' Wish(2)
Figure 7-2: Penguins' Wish(2)
[21:17] Part B. A melody as vast as the sky combined with an odd time signature(Figure 7-3).
Penguins' Wish(3)
Figure 7-3: Penguins' Wish(3)
[21:40] Part C is a free phrase played in 7/8 time, describing the wish of the penguins.
[23:02] After the end of part C, the songs are played in the order of going back to part B and part A.

8Serpent [24:03]

It is atonal music, that is, music without tonality, such as C major or D minor.
Atonal, 4/4 time, sonata form. Exposition -> Development -> Recapitulation. The motif is "atonal".

8.1Exposition [24:03]



[24:03] An abrupt introduction(Figure 8-1).
Serpent(1)
Figure 8-1: Serpent(1)
[24:17] The first subject group is harmonized as a whole in that each note is not harmonized. It is played twice with different details(Figure 8-2).
Serpent(2)
Figure 8-2: Serpent(2)
[25:14] The second subject group has a dissonant yet singing tune. Slight sweetness spreads comfortably(Figure 8-3).
Serpent(3)
Figure 8-3: Serpent(3)

8.2Development [25:31]



[25:31] A free-flowing development played over a rhythm of eighth notes. The piece concludes with the only harmonious sound.

8.3Recapitulation [26:10]



[26:10] Reproduction of the exposition. The transition between the first subject group and the second subject group is removed, and the music folds toward the end.

9Minuet Of Soap Bubbles [27:13]

The bubbles were fluffy and seemed to be dancing a minuet.
E flat major, 3/4 time, sonata form. Exposition -> Development -> Recapitulation. The motif is "minuet".

9.1Exposition [27:13]



[27:13] First subject group. The melody is played by recorder over the slow accompaniment in 3 time(Figure 9-1).
Minuet Of Soap Bubbles(1)
Figure 9-1: Minuet Of Soap Bubbles(1)
[27:54] Dedicated transition that appeals to something(Figure 9-2).
Minuet Of Soap Bubbles(2)
Figure 9-2: Minuet Of Soap Bubbles(2)
[28:11] A spontaneous second subject group. It is played twice, but the chords when the melody reaches the top are different, so the first time gives a sad impression and the second time gives a warm impression(Figure 9-3).
Minuet Of Soap Bubbles(3)
Figure 9-3: Minuet Of Soap Bubbles(3)

9.2Development [28:43]



[28:43] This is a development with peaceful and fantastic phrases. In contrast to the bright exposition, it is played in a shady atmosphere without too much excitement(Figure 9-4).
Minuet Of Soap Bubbles(4)
Figure 9-4: Minuet Of Soap Bubbles(4)

9.3Recapitulation [29:48]



[29:48] This is a reproduction of the exposition. Once again, a bright and sunny scene is depicted.

10Fire Festival At Dusk [30:53]

The people begin their rituals around the soaring flames.
F sharp minor, 11/16 time, sonata form. Exposition -> Development -> Recapitulation. The motif is "folk dance".

10.1Exposition [30:53]



[31:00] The first subject group. The rhythm and melody are passionate and dramatic. It is played twice(Figure 10-1).
Fire Festival At Dusk(1)
Figure 10-1: Fire Festival At Dusk(1)
[31:43] The second subject group. While the first subject group is in minor key, the second subject group is in major key(Figure 10-2).
Fire Festival At Dusk(2)
Figure 10-2: Fire Festival At Dusk(2)

10.2Development [32:05]



[32:05] Development. After a while of rhythm, a long phrase is played in one breath, starting with the same beginning as the first subject group.

10.3Recapitulation [33:04]



[33:04] Reproduction of the exposition. The second subject group is still in a jolly major key, which leads to the next piece.

11Non-alcoholic Cocktails [34:09]

Shake equal amounts of lemon, orange, and pineapple juices together and you're done.
A-flat major, 4/4 time, rondo form. A -> B -> A -> C -> A -> B -> A. The motif is "swing jazz".

11.1Part A [34:09]



[34:09] A phrase with swing, consisting of only triplets. It's a slightly loose, de-energized melody(Figure 11-1).
Non-alcoholic Cocktails(1)
Figure 11-1: Non-alcoholic Cocktails(1)

11.2Part B [34:32]



[34:32] The phrase has a skipping rhythm and a rather fancy sound(Figure 11-2).
Non-alcoholic Cocktails(2)
Figure 11-2: Non-alcoholic Cocktails(2)

11.3Part A [34:43]



[34:43] Part A is played again.

11.4Part C [34:54]



[34:54] The phrase is forward, with only the melody sounding one triple note earlier. The sweet-sounding melody is played twice, with lots of seventh- and ninth-degree chords(Figure 11-3).
Non-alcoholic Cocktails(3)
Figure 11-3: Non-alcoholic Cocktails(3)
[35:37] In the second half, improvisational phrases rang out freely.

11.5Part A [36:01]



[36:01] Part A is played again.

11.6Part B [36:24]



[36:24] Part B is played again.

11.7Part A [36:35]



[36:35] Part A is played again.

12Flood Of Stardust [36:59]

When I looked up, I saw that the night sky was flooded with stardust.
B-flat major, 4/4 time, free-form. The motif is "happy hardcore".
[37:04] A sparkling, sad, yet bright, catchy melody is played twice, in different tones, on a light rhythm(Figure 12-1).
Flood Of Stardust(1)
Figure 12-1: Flood Of Stardust(1)
[37:46] In the middle section, a minimalist and easy to understand phrase is repeated over and over again(Figure 12-2).
Flood Of Stardust(2)
Figure 12-2: Flood Of Stardust(2)
[38:49] Then the first catchy melody is recreated, followed by a minimalist phrase for the final spurt.
[39:53] The song ends with a flourish(Figure 12-3).
Flood Of Stardust(3)
Figure 12-3: Flood Of Stardust(3)
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